Fishguard

A collection of stories about Fishguard and Goodwick, and their coastal surrounds.

Fishguard in Focus

Fishguard is a coastal town in north Pembrokeshire, overlooking Cardigan Bay. Its name in Welsh, Abergwaun, reflects its position at the mouth of the Gwaun river; its name in English derives from the Old Norse Fiskigarðr – ‘fish catching enclosure’ –…

Cable Ties | Ceblau’n Cysylltu

In our world of instant communications it’s hard to imagine that it once took ten days to send a message from North America to Europe. That was the fastest a ship could go - if the weather was favourable. All this changed in 1858 when the first…

Of Mermaids and Fairies | Môr-forynion a’r Tylwyth Teg

In Pembrokeshire, fairies are commonly known as Plant Rhys Ddwfn, the ‘children of Rhys the Deep’, ‘deep’ here referring to depth of character. This particular tribe or type of fairies are of diminutive size like that of a 5- or 6-year old child.…

Pedalling through Wales

Seventy years ago, a young woman from Lismore County Waterford set out with her bicycle on her first trip out of Ireland alone. The trip would take her to England, a ‘Pagan land’ something that did not go unnoticed by her neighbours some of whom were…

Fishguard and the Cunard Line | Abergwaun a’r Cunard Line

In August 1909, the port of Fishguard in Pembrokeshire hit the headlines. The Cunard Steamship Company had chosen Fishguard as its first port-of-call for its Atlantic liners. In its inaugural crossing from New York to Fishguard, the Cunard ship…

We'll Keep a Welcome in the Harbour

The saying goes that you never get a better welcome than at Fishguard. This is entirely down to a group of volunteers who call themselves the Fishguard Friendly Faces. Jana Davidson sat down with Ports, Past and Present to talk how the award-winning…

When Abercastle met Alfred | Pan ddaeth Alfred i Abercastell

The inhabitants of Abercastle, Pembrokeshire were much surprised on Saturday [10th August 1876] by the arrival on their coast of a seaman named Alfred Johnson in an open boat in which he left Gloucester Massachusetts on the 15th June. The boat is…

The First Flight | Yr Hediad Cyntaf

In 1912 'aeroplaning', as it was then known, was in its infancy. Owning an aeroplane was something that only the rich could indulge in. But indulge in it they did. One of these early aeroplane pioneers was Denys Corbett Wilson. An Anglo-Irishman, his…

The Fishguard Herrings | Sgadan Abergwaun

David Pepper sat down with Ports, Past and Present to share the origin of the old nickname for the people of Fishguard in the once properous trade in herrings before the disappearance of the vast schoals in the eighteenth century.

100 Minutes

To celebrate the 100th anniversary of the first flight from Britain to Ireland by Denys Corbett Wilson in April 1912, many activities were planned in Fishguard and Enniscorthy for the weekend of 20 to 22 April, 2012 including exhibitions, the…

Fishguard's Irish Groove | Naws Gwyddelig Abergwaun

Folk music in this part of Pembrokeshire has a distincly Irish sound and local phone registers contain many Irish family names. Gary Jones sat down with Ports, Past and Present to explain how the advantagous geography of Fishguard harbour had an…

Fishguard at Your Feet | Troedio Abergwaun

For first-time visitors of Fishguard, the Gorsedd circle is a great stop to gain a great view over the bay and Lower Town at their feet to the Preseli Hills in the far distance. Gary Jones talked to Ports, Past and Present why the Gorsedd circle is…

Fishguarrrd! | Aberrrgwaun!

In 1779, US-born Stephen Manhant attacked Fishguard with his ship Black Prince, sailing under a French flag. Prior to his attack on Fishguard, Manhant had destroyed over 30 ships sailing under a British flag and taken many prisoners with the plan to…